Law 331 - Immigration Law

Hiroshi Motomura

Hiroshi Motomura

Susan Westerberg Prager Distinguished Professor of Law
Inaugural Faculty Director, Center for Immigration Law and Policy
B.A. Yale, 1974
J.D. UC Berkeley, 1978
UCLA Faculty Since 2007
Course Description:

The course focuses on the answers to four principal questions: who is a citizen of the United States?; who else can come to this country as an immigrant or a visitor?; when and why can non-citizens in the United States be forced to leave?; and how and why does immigration and citizenship status matter?  In turn, these questions will prompt us to examine the history of immigration to the United States, the constitutional rights of non-citizens, the federal agencies that administer immigration and citizenship laws, undocumented immigration, refugees and asylum, and the role of states and localities in immigration.  Additionally, the course is an opportunity to learn and apply general principles of constitutional law and administrative law in a substantively focused setting, to develop statutory interpretation skills in a complex, technical context, and to analyze the interaction between statutes and the U.S. Constitution.

Law 332 (Immigrants’ Rights) is not a prerequisite.

Course Learning Outcomes:

This course offers an opportunity to acquire a strong command of the core areas of immigration law doctrine. This will include a thorough knowledge of the key aspects of the primary federal immigration law statutes and regulations, as well as the constitutional doctrines (esp. equal protection and the First Amendment) that define the limits on government decisions on admission to, and expulsion from, the United States. Beyond this substantive knowledge, this course offers an opportunity to learn to read complex statutes, and to analyze the interaction between statutes and the Constitution. In addition, you should expect to delve into the evolution of immigration law in the context of institutional, historical, economic, and political forces. In this respect, this course provides a vehicle for understanding the role of law in broader societal context. This course will also include constant opportunities to think about immigration law in practical contexts. For example: how would you advise a family seeking to be reunited in the United States; what are the best arguments available to defend (or to challenge) the constitutionality of new immigration laws and policies; how as a practical matter would you prove qualifications for an admission category; how would you interview and advise an employer who wants to bring employees from another country to the United States? Though this is a doctrinal course and not a clinic, most sessions will be centered around practice-based scenarios.

This course will not satisfy the Professional Responsibility requirement, and it will not satisfy the substantial analytic writing (SAW) requirement.

Course Information:
​Faculty Term Course Section ​Schedule ​Units Requisite Satisfies SAW
Hiroshi Motomura 20F 331 LEC 1 MWR 1:45 PM - 3:00 PM 4.0 No No
Hiroshi Motomura 20F 331 LEC 2 MWR 3:45 PM - 5:00 PM 4.0 No No
Textbook Information:
Textbook for Fall 2020 LEC 1
Aleinikoff et al. Immigration and Nationality Laws of the United States: Selected Statutes, Regulations, and Forms   2020 ed.  
ISBN: 9781684679690. West Academic. REQUIRED $57.00
Textbook for Fall 2020 LEC 2
Aleinikoff et al. Immigration and Nationality Laws of the United States: Selected Statutes, Regulations, and Forms   2020 ed.  
ISBN: 9781684679690. West Academic. REQUIRED $57.00
Categories
Immigration Law;