Law 165 - Foundations of Energy Law and Regulation

William Boyd

William Boyd

Professor of Law
B.A. University of North Carolina, 1989
M.A. University of California, Berkeley, 1994
Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, 2002
J.D. Stanford Law School, 2002
UCLA Faculty since 2018
Course Description:

This course provides an introduction to some of the key concepts and debates in U.S. energy law and regulation. Students will gain an understanding of the most important legal and economic concepts that have structured U.S. energy regulation, while also investigating how specific debates within the field have informed and interacted with broader discussions about the public interest, conceptions of property, regulatory capture, market design, structures of federalism, and the climate change challenge. The course proceeds historically – from the origins of modern public utility regulation in the late nineteenth century to the ongoing transition to a clean energy system. Each class session is organized around a major concept or question in U.S. energy law and seeks to provide context and depth for topics that are covered only briefly (if at all) in the Energy Law and Regulation class. The course takes to heart the “law through scholarship” suggestion from the 1L Curriculum Review Committee. Most of the class readings and discussions will thus focus on a particular article or set of articles (some of which are “classics” in the field) as vehicles for exploring the broader concepts and debates. Class sessions will be a mix of lecture and discussion. The course is designed to provide a foundation for additional coursework in energy law and regulation and/or regulated industries, but it should be attractive to students interested in business law, law and economics, legal history, law and political economy, and environmental law.

Course Learning Outcomes:

Understand foundational legal and economic concepts that have structured U.S. energy regulation

Understand major regulatory approaches in U.S. energy law

Engage critically with legal scholarship; understand how such scholarship has influenced the field of energy law; understand how such scholarship has informed and interacted with broader questions about the public interest, conceptions of property, regulatory capture, market design, structures of federalism, and the clean energy transition

Course Information:
​Faculty Term Course Section ​Schedule ​Units Requisite Satisfies SAW
William Boyd 20S 165 LEC 2 Unscheduled 1.0 No No