Gerald López

Professor of Law

Gerald López B.A. University of Southern California, 1970
J.D. Harvard, 1974
UCLA Faculty Since 1978
lopez@law.ucla.edu

Biography | Bibliography | Courses

In 1975, after a clerkship with the Honorable Edward J. Schwartz, Gerald P. López joined Tom Adler, Roy Cazares and Napoleon Jones in founding a San Diego law firm specializing in criminal defense, civil rights litigation and community mobilization. In 2003, López founded the Center for Community Problem Solving in New York City working with low-income, of color, and immigrant communities to address social, economic and legal problems.

Professor López has served on the NYU, Stanford, and Harvard law faculties. Among the courses he teaches are Rebellious Lawyering Workshop, Reentry Clinic, Economic Development Clinic, Problem Solving Workshop and Transforming Legal Education Workshop

López has litigated extensively as lead counsel in a wide variety of criminal and civil matters before trial courts, appellate courts, and the United States Supreme Court. With others, he has championed a rebellious vision of progressive law practice -- and of the problem solving of which lawyering is one example.

Professor López has published many acclaimed community-focused books, including Reentry Guide to New York City (2005); Streetwise About Money (2006); A Fair and Just Workplace (2006), and many articles on problem solving, race, immigration, health of undocumented Mexicans, and legal education. He is the author of Rebellious Lawyering (1992), an influential book about lawyering, progressive law practice and community problem solving. While the Kenneth & Harle Montgomery Professor of Public Interest Law, he helped found the Lawyering for Social Change Program at Stanford Law School, and he is currently a core faculty member of the UCLA’s Critical Race Studies Program.  López has been honored with many community, civil rights and teaching awards, including Stanford Law's and UCLA Law’s Teacher of the Year, UCLA Law's Rutter Award for Teaching Excellence, and UCLA's university-wide Distinguished Teaching Award, the Eby Award for the Art of Teaching.